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soft drinks uno kit


Certified soft drinks flavour standards kit used to train professional tasters to recognize and scale the intensity of ten different off-flavours and taints found in soft drinks and juices.

Use them to deliver up to two hours of taster training for ten people. Each AROXA uno soft drinks flavour standards kit comes complete with a presentation box and flavour cards. AROXA™ soft drinks flavour standards are: food grade | free from sensory impurities | extensively tested | safe to smell and taste. Unsure whether this kit is right for you? Don't forget about our 100% satisfaction guarantee.

Flavour cards

Flavour standard information

AROXA Uno soft drinks flavour standards kit
earn 7 points
£99.00

Diacetyl, like butter, or butter popcorn”

  • Sub-product label image2,3-butanedione
  • Number of capsulesNumber of capsules
  • Chemical structure

2,3-butanedione

300 µg per capsule

Technical specification

Assessment
The best way to detect diacetyl flavour in soft drinks is as follows. Without covering the glass, swirl the sample to release the aroma. Take a single short sniff. Repeat as necessary.
Amount of flavour per capsule
300 µg per capsule
Threshold
The flavour threshold of diacetyl in soft drinks is 100 µg / l.
Origins
Diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) is produced by contaminant lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc). Some yeasts produce a precursor of this compound which can give rise to 2,3-butanedione formation during product storage.
Importance
Diacetyl Imparts a sweet, butter-like note. Its presence can be indicative of microbiological spoilage of soft drinks by lactic acid bacteria or by alcoholic yeasts.
CAS registry number
The CAS registry number for 2,3,-butanedione is 431-03-8.
Other names
  • diacetyl
  • biacetyl
  • 2,3-butane dione
  • butane-2,3-dione
  • 2,3-diketobutane
  • dimethyl diketone
  • dimethyl glyoxal
  • 2,3-dioxobutane
Remarks
Diacetyl is associated with formation of lactic and acetic acids when produced by contaminant lactic acid bacteria, and acetaldehyde when formed by contaminant alcoholic yeasts.
Threshold distribution
Graph
Capsules per pot
10
Legal notices
This product is protected by the following trade marks and patents:
  • US Patent no. D679900
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009937574
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009856527
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345057
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345056

Butyric, rancid, like baby vomit”

  • Sub-product label imagebutyric acid
  • Number of capsulesNumber of capsules
  • Chemical structure

butyric acid

4.5 mg per capsule

Technical specification

Assessment
The best way to evaluate rancid flavours in soft drinks arising from butyric acid is as follows. Cover the sample with your hand and swirl the glass to release the aroma. Remove your hand and take a single long sniff. Repeat as necessary.
Amount of flavour per capsule
4.5 mg per capsule
Threshold
The flavour threshold of butyric acid in soft drinks is 1.5 mg / l.
Origins
Butyric acid is produced in sugar syrups by bacteria, including Bacillus spp and Clostridium spp. It is also occasionally caused by penetration of adhesive label components into soft drinks which have been packaged in plastic bottles.
Importance
Butyric acid imparts a rancid note to soft drinks, reminiscent of baby vomit, which is especially prominent in products of low pH value. While regarded as desirable in some types of confectionery, it is generally rejected by consumers of soft drinks.
CAS registry number
The CAS registry number of butyric acid is 107-92-6.
Other names
  • butanoic acid
  • butanic acid
  • n-butanoic acid
  • 1-butyric acid
  • n-butyric acid
  • ethyl acetic acid
  • 1-propane carboxylic acid
  • propyl formic acid
Remarks
The intensity of butyric flavour notes in soft drinks can be increased by the presence of other fatty acids (including valeric and Isovaleric acids) and by carbonyl compounds such as 2,3-butanedione.
Threshold distribution
Graph
Capsules per pot
10
Legal notices
This product is protected by the following trade marks and patents:
  • US Patent no. D679900
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009937574
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009856527
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345057
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345056

Chlorophenol, like antiseptic mouthwash”

  • Sub-product label image2,6-dichlorophenol
  • Number of capsulesNumber of capsules
  • Chemical structure

2,6-dichlorophenol

500 ng per capsule

Technical specification

Assessment
The best way to detect chlorophenoiic taints in soft drinks is as follows, Without covering the glass, swirl the sample to release the aroma. Take a single short sniff. Repeat as necessary.
Amount of flavour per capsule
500 ng per capsule
Threshold
The flavour threshold of 2,6-dichlorophenol in soft drinks is 50 - 160 ng / l.
Origins
Chlorophenols can taint soft drinks and juices through ingredients, water or packaging materials. Antiseptic taints due to chlorophenols are especially associated with use of recycled wood and cardboard in packaging materials.
Importance
2,6-Dichlorophenol imparts an antiseptic, medicinal note to contaminated soft drinks. The taints is regarded by consumers as unpleasant and tainted even at low levels. Chlorophenols are produced through reactions involving phenolic compounds and free chlorine.
CAS registry number
The CAS registry number for 2,6-dichlorophenol is 87-65-0.
Other names
  • 1-hydroxy-2,6-dichlorobenzene
  • 2,6-DCP
  • 2,6-dichlorfenol
Remarks
Water pH is important in determining the rate of formation of chlorophenols. Chlorophenols can be produced by bacterial action. In such cases this is often linked to misuse of carbon filters. Accidental use of chlorinated water in product formulation can also give rise to chlorophenolic taints.
Threshold distribution
Graph
Capsules per pot
10
Legal notices
This product is protected by the following trade marks and patents:
  • US Patent no. D679900
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009937574
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009856527
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345057
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345056

DMS, like sweetcorn or tomato sauce”

  • Sub-product label imagedimethyl sulphide
  • Number of capsulesNumber of capsules
  • Chemical structure

dimethyl sulphide

75 µg per capsule

Technical specification

Assessment
The best way to evaluate sulphury flavours from dimethyl sulphide (DMS) flavour in soft drinks is as follows. Without covering the glass, swirl the sample to release the aroma. Take a single short sniff. Repeat as necessary.
Amount of flavour per capsule
75 µg per capsule
Threshold
The flavour threshold of dimethyl sulphide in soft drinks is 25 µg / l.
Origins
DMS is a contaminant introduced to soft drinks through use of insufficiently-purified carbon dioxide. This flavour can also arise through bacterial spoilage of ingredients and additives.
Importance
Dimethyl sulphide is associated with sulphury and ‘muddy’ odours notes. It is an indicator of contamination of the carbon dioxide supply. DMS can also be associated with contamination of the water supply with faecal bacteria.
CAS registry number
The CAS registry number of dimethyl sulphide is 75-18-3.
Other names
  • DMS
  • dimethyl monosulfide
  • methylsulfanylmethane
  • methyl monosulfide
  • methane thiomethane
  • methyl sulfide
  • methyl thioether
  • methylsulfanylmethane
  • 2-thiapropane
  • thiobis(methane)
  • thiobismethane
Remarks
Other sulphur compounds may be found alongside dimethyl sulphide in contaminated carbon dioxide. Indole and skatole are often found in water in which DMS has been produced by bacteria. Fruity flavours arising from 2-pentanone may be present in water in which the DMS has been formed by algae.
Threshold distribution
Graph
Capsules per pot
10
Legal notices
This product is protected by the following trade marks and patents:
  • US Patent no. D679900
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009937574
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009856527
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345057
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345056

Metallic, like ink or blood”

  • Sub-product label imageferrous sulphate
  • Number of capsulesNumber of capsules
  • Chemical structure

ferrous sulphate

5.4 mg per capsule

Technical specification

Assessment
The best way to detect metallic taints in soft drinks is as follows. Take a little sample into your mouth. Move it around with your tongue for a few seconds then swallow it. To confirm, rub a little onto the back of your hand and check for metallic odour.
Amount of flavour per capsule
5.4 mg per capsule
Threshold
The flavour threshold of ferrous sulphate in soft drinks is 1.8 mg / l.
Origins
Metallic taints in soft drinks are derived from contamination of raw materials or process water with metal ions or from or from corrosion of process plant. Metallic odours can also be produced by lipid oxidation
Importance
Metallic flavour problems are often of external origin (taints) and occasionally formed within the product itself (off-flavour). Metallic character is primarily a mouthfeel characteristicl but sometimes product odour, colour and clarity can be affected.
CAS registry number
The CAS registry number for ferrous sulphate is 7782-63-0.
Other names
  • ferrous sulfate
  • iron(2+) sulfate
  • iron(2+) sulphate
  • ferrous sulphate heptahydrate
  • ferrous sulfate heptahydrate
  • iron(2+) sulfate heptahydrate
  • iron(II) sulfate heptahydrate
  • iron(II) sulphate heptahydrate
Remarks
Copper, manganese and other metals can also confer metallic notes in soft drinks. The intensity of metallic notes can be influenced by the type and concentration of product component, including sweeteners, polyphenols and clouding agents.
Threshold distribution
Graph
Capsules per pot
10
Legal notices
This product is protected by the following trade marks and patents:
  • US Patent no. D679900
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009937574
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009856527
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345057
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345056

Smoky, like smoked fish or cheese”

  • Sub-product label imageguaiacol
  • Number of capsulesNumber of capsules
  • Chemical structure

guaiacol

67 µg per capsule

Technical specification

Assessment
The best way to evaluate smoky, disinfectant-like flavour notes in soft drinks and juices caused by guaiacol is as follows.Without covering the glass, swirl the sample to release the aroma. Take a single short sniff. Repeat as necessary.
Amount of flavour per capsule
67 µg per capsule
Threshold
The flavour threshold of guaiacol in soft drinks is 22 µg / l.
Origins
The presence of guaiacol in soft drinks can be caused by growth of Alicyclobacillus bacteria in packaged product or in ingredients. This microorganism is acidophilic and survives pasteurization. It converts vanillin present in the product, and derived from ingredients and / or flavourings, to less desirable guaiacol.
Importance
Guaiacol imparts an undesirable smoky / disinfectant-like note to affected soft drinks and fruit juices. The flavour tends toward a more medicinal note when bromophenols, formed by the same contaminant bacteria, are present.
CAS registry number
The CAS registry number for guaiacol is 90-05-1.
Other names
  • 2-methoxyphenol
  • anastil
  • guajacol
  • guajol
  • guasol
  • 1-hydroxy-2-methoxybenzene
  • 2-hydroxyanisole
  • ortho-hydroxyanisole
  • 1-oxy-2- methoxybenzene
  • ortho- methoxyphenol
  • methyl catechol
  • ortho- methyl catechol
  • pyrocatechol methyl ester
  • pyrocatechol monomethyl ether
Remarks
Flavour notes similar to those imparted to soft drinks by guaiacol can arise due to smoke damage of raw materials and / or packaging materials.
Threshold distribution
Graph
Capsules per pot
10

H2S, like boiled or rotten eggs”

  • Sub-product label imagehydrogen sulphide
  • Number of capsulesNumber of capsules
  • Chemical structure

hydrogen sulphide

24 µg per capsule

Technical specification

Assessment
The best way to reliably detect hydrogen sulphide in soft drinks is as follows. Without covering the glass, swirl the sample to release the aroma. Take a single short sniff. Repeat as necessary while taking great care not to saturate your odour receptors with the flavour.
Amount of flavour per capsule
24 µg per capsule
Threshold
The flavour threshold of hydrogen sulphide in soft drinks is 8 µg / l.
Origins
H2S is a contaminant of carbonated soft drinks which an be Introduced through use of insufficiently-purified carbon dioxide. It can also arise through microbiological spoilage by bacteria, and through chemical reactions involving metal surfaces in caned products.
Importance
Hydrogen sulphide imparts an unpleasant sulphury note to contaminated soft drinks. H2S is easily oxidized to less odour-active species, so its presence is indicative of the failure of water treatment processes or contamination arising during production of soft drinks.
CAS registry number
The CAS registry number for H2S is 7783-06-4.
Other names
  • H2S
  • hydrogen sulfide
  • dihydrogen monosulfide
  • dihydrogen monosulphide
  • hydrogen sulfuric acid
  • hydrogen sulphuric acid
  • sulfur hydride
Remarks
Other sulphur compounds may be found alongside H2S in contaminated carbon dioxide supplies. Be careful not to overexpose yourself to samples with H2S. The more you look for it the less likely you are to find it.
Threshold distribution
Graph
Capsules per pot
10

Kerosine, like petroleum or geranium”

  • Sub-product label image1,3-pentadiene
  • Number of capsulesNumber of capsules
  • Chemical structure

1,3-pentadiene

300 µg per capsule

Technical specification

Assessment
Te best way to evaluate the kerosine-like flavour note associated with 1,3-pentadiene is as follows. Cover the sample with your hand and swirl the glass to release the aroma. Remove your hand and take a single long sniff. Repeat as necessary.
Amount of flavour per capsule
300 µg per capsule
Threshold
The flavour threshold of 1,3-pentadiene in soft drinks is 100 µg / l.
Origins
1,3-Pentadiene is produced by contaminant microorganisms. Moulds such as Penicillium and Trichoderma, and yeasts such as Zygosaccharmoyces and Debaromyces convert odourless sorbic acid used as a preservatives in some soft drinks and fruit juices into the highly odour active molecule 1,3-pentadiene.
Importance
1,3-Pentadiene imparts a potent ‘chemical’ taint to affected products. It is typically described as kerosene-like, with additional descriptors of plastic, paint, and geranium depending on the nature of the affected product. Styrene may also be formed together with 2,3-pentadiene by some organisms. during spoilage of soft drinks and fruit juices, or the ingredients from which they are made, by moulds.
CAS registry number
The CAS registry number for 1,3-pentadiene is 504-60-9.
Other names
  • 1-methylbutadiene
  • 1,3-PD
  • (Z)-1,3-pentadiene
  • cis-piperylene
  • cis-1-methylbutadiene
  • cis-1,3-pentadiene
  • 1,cis-3-pentadiene
  • (3Z)-1,3-pentadiene
  • pentadiene-1,3,cis
  • (Z)-penta-1,3-diene
Remarks
Formation of 1,3-pentadiene in soft drinks containing preservatives is somewhat ironic, since the very organisms that the sorbate preservatives are intended to inhibit are responsible for the formation of this potent and undesirable flavour compound.
Threshold distribution
Graph
Capsules per pot
10
Legal notices
This product is protected by the following trade marks and patents:
  • US Patent no. D679900
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009937574
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009856527
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345057
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345056

Plastics, like polystyrene”

  • Sub-product label imagestyrene
  • Number of capsulesNumber of capsules
  • Chemical structure

styrene

338 µg per capsule

Technical specification

Assessment
The best way to detect the presence of styrene in soft drinks is as follows. Cover the sample with your hand and swirl the glass to release the aroma. Remove your hand and take a single long sniff. Repeat as necessary.
Amount of flavour per capsule
338 µg per capsule
Threshold
The flavour threshold of styrene in soft drinks is 110 µg / l.
Origins
Styrene can contaminate plastic bottles and, in turn, impart a taint to the soft drinks or juices packaged into these bottles. It can also arise from the action of contaminant yeasts and moulds. Use of defective carbon dioxide is occasionally to blame for styrene contamination incidents.
Importance
Styrene is often described by consumers as ‘chemical’, ‘plasticy’ (like polystyrene) or ‘contaminated’. When formed by yeasts or moulds, additional compounds such as 4-vinyl guaiacol and 1,3-pentadiene may be present which can modify the flavour making the drink more 'medicinal', 'smoky' in the case of guaiaco, or like kerosine in the case of pentadiene.
CAS registry number
100-42-5
Other names
  • ethenylbenzene
  • phenyl ethene
  • phenyl ethylene
  • styrol
  • styrolene
  • vinyl benzene
  • vinyl benzol
Remarks
Other compounds can impart plastic-like notes to soft drinks. Samples containing this standard are best tasted in glass, rather than in plastic, to avoid loss of odour.
Threshold distribution
Graph
Capsules per pot
10

Musty, like corked wine with a rubbery overtone”

  • Sub-product label image2,4,6-tribromoanisole
  • Number of capsulesNumber of capsules
  • Chemical structure

2,4,6-tribromoanisole

450 ng per capsule

Technical specification

Assessment
The best way to detect musty taints caused by haloanisoles such as 2,4,6-tribromoanisole is as follows. Without covering the glass, swirl the sample to release the aroma. Take a single short sniff. Repeat as necessary.
Amount of flavour per capsule
450 ng per capsule
Threshold
The flavour threshold of 2,4,6-tribromoanisole in soft drinks ranges from <10 to 500 ng / l.
Origins
2,4,6-Tribromoanisole contaminates soft drinks through ingredients, water, air or packaging materials. Taints from such haloanisoles are associated with use of recycled materials such as wood and cardboard. 2,4,6-Tribromoanisole is derived from methylation of bromophenols by moulds.
Importance
2,4,6-Tribromoanisole imparts an unpleasant musty odour which is reminiscent of damp cellars or corked wine. This is one of the few flavours that can taint soft drinks through airborne contamination, even after the product has been packaged.
CAS registry number
The CAS registry number for 2,4,6-tribromoanisole is 607-99-8.
Other names
  • tribromoanisole
  • TBA
  • 1,3,5-tribromo-2-methoxybenzene
  • methyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether
Remarks
2,4,6-Tribromoanisole is one of several bromoanisoles that can taint soft drinks. The flavour produced by this compound is typical. It can be detected, but not recognized at concentrations well below the recognition flavour threshold.
Threshold distribution
Graph
Capsules per pot
10
Legal notices
This product is protected by the following trade marks and patents:
  • US Patent no. D679900
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009937574
  • European Community Trade Mark
    Registration no. 009856527
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345057
  • US Trade Mark Registration no. 4345056